Starting an MBA Student Club: A Success Story (Quick Reads)

Starting an MBA Student Club: A Success Story

Apart from regular lectures, getting involved in university campus life will add greatly to your MBA experience. Joining a student club will allow you to not only learn a lot from others, but take your networking to the next level by enabling you to attend exciting events and travel the world. MBA student Michael Longaro tapped his passion for politics to start his own political and public affairs club at ESADE. Read below for a summary of the experience he shared with The Economist.

Helpful for: MBA Applicants

Read Time: 7 minutes

Quick Facts:

  • Make sure you have a clear and strong reason for pursuing an MBA. This will make you a more confident applicant and show the admissions committee that you are self-aware. Michael shares his:

Selected Quote:

My rationale for pursuing an MBA was that it would give me a solid understanding of business fundamentals, from finance and corporate strategy, to marketing and innovation, whilst allowing me to hone the management skills I had gathered while working in the public sector. I also hoped it would complement the knowledge I had acquired from my two previous degrees, a bachelor’s in International Studies and a master’s in European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.

  • Explore the student life and different organizations the university has before you decide on a school. Michael noticed that ESADE didn’t have a student club which focused on the link between government and the private sector—a passion of his, so he decided to create one. Once he received his acceptance letter, he knew that this club’s aim would be to help MBA students understand how business and politics work together in society.
  • There is some paperwork involved when creating a new student club. At ESADE, the student-government association must see your mission and goals outlined in a charter. Once club registrations opened, Michael had 25 students register for his club. This interest allowed for a budget to be received, which can be used for organizing events. Afterwards, Michael chose his board members, assigning duties, and they all got to work on their first event in Brussels.
  • Michael’s club members travelled to different European institutions where they got the chance to see policy-making up close and meet with industry professionals. They were also able to attract new companies and organizations to come back to their campus, including the United Nations Development Program and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
  • Smaller events like movie nights, debates and discussions also took place back on campus and were a great way to forge strong connections with colleagues.

Useful Information:

  • As your student club grows, it’s important to stick with your vision and have long-term goals that will push its members to learn new things and create memorable experiences. Michael looks forward to welcoming incoming MBA students and hopes to prepare them for positions at the intersection of business and government.

What kind of student club would you start and why? Write your thoughts in our forum!

Source: The Economist

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