Redesigned TOEIC Bridge Tests for Intermediate English Launched in East Asia

Redesigned TOEIC Bridge Tests for Intermediate English Launched in East Asia

ETS announced it has launched the redesigned four-skills TOEIC Bridge tests in Japan, Korea and Taiwan, and continues to roll-out the new suite of TOEIC Bridge assessments worldwide.

ETS plans earlier this year to redesign the TOEIC Bridge tests, which now will measure speaking and writing skills, in addition to listening and reading skills.

Check out: ETS to Redesign TOEIC Bridge Tests

The TOEIC Bridge tests are used to:

  • Place individuals in the appropriate English-language learning course for their skill level
  • Screen and place individuals in employment positions that require basic to intermediate everyday communication skills
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of beginning-level training programs

Individuals can build their foundational skills and prepare to progress toward more advanced English-language proficiency. Among other capabilities, score users can also use TOEIC Bridge scores and information to:

  • Identify test takers’ relative strengths and weaknesses with respect to different language skills
  • Track or benchmark an individual’s development or improvement over time in order to monitor growth in language skills or overall proficiency
  • Determine readiness for more advanced English-language instruction and assessment

Feng Yu, Executive Director of the TOEIC program at ETS, said:

The redesigned TOEIC Bridge tests were developed using the same rigor and quality control that make the TOEIC program the trusted global standard for measuring English-language proficiency in the workplace.

The redesigned TOEIC Bridge tests focus on an individual’s basic- to intermediate-level English proficiency by assessing all four communication skills — listening, reading, speaking and writing — in everyday life and common workplace scenarios that reflect modern language uses and communication methods. The suite provides performance feedback to enable more effective teaching that in turn helps test takers progress on the path to advanced English-language proficiency. In addition, score users will experience greater flexibility and convenience as skills can now be combined into complementary modules to suit their specific needs.

Check out: Which Admission Test Should You Take First?

Source: ETS

Valentin Vassilev

About Valentin Vassilev

Valentin Vassilev has a Master’s degree in International Media Studies from Deutsche Welle Akademie and the University of Bonn as well as a Bachelor's degree in Applied Linguistics from the University of Veliko Tarnovo. He has a background in business journalism, having written about European political, economic and business issues. Valentin is currently a content writer and editor at business education services provider Advent Group.

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