How to Study like Children (Quick Reads)

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How to Study like Children (Quick Reads)

It might seem like a relief to hear that the most important study skills needed to succeed at grad school have actually been put into practice since kindergarten. In this Magoosh article summary, we take a walk down memory lane and remind ourselves of how to study like children, making the process both rewarding and fun.

Helpful for: MBA and Master’s Applicants

Read Time: 6 minutes

Quick Facts:

  • When we were kids, we were encouraged by our teachers to make out the meaning of the world using all of our senses – touch, sight, smell and sound. This high level of curiosity, known as sensory learning, comes in great use in grad school, especially when analyzing complex data and problem-solving. For example, when presented with abstract concepts in a lecture, you may find that sketching mind maps helps you visualize things clearer.
  • Play activities and games increase confidence in young children. As a grad student, that may translate into joining a debating team to practice public speaking and defending your position on a political issue, or reading your latest poem at a poetry slam. Being involved in such activities not only enriches your learning experience but also expands your network.
  • The hands-on approach is the primary method of learning in early childhood education. Do you remember using wooden blocks and counting geometric shapes when being introduced to addition and subtraction? How about jumping over buckets or hiding in a cupboard? Even though you might not have been aware of it, these simple actions developed your spatial awareness – the relationship between you and your surroundings. In order to fully benefit from your postgrad experience, using this approach may mean testing out theories outside of class, or meeting with your professor to discuss and chalk out a solution to a challenging problem.

Useful Information:

  • Learning through cooperation is a great skill that involves working in a group to complete a task. As children, it often meant developing an understanding of another’s thoughts and emotions. On a deeper level, it means practicing listening to others and considering all ideas that are brought forward by team members.

In her article, Jackie Berkery gives an example of the cooperative learning we use as adults:

Selected Quote:

Study groups are a powerful learning tool that can help you understand concepts more thoroughly than if you study alone. That’s because you’ll need to be able to collaborate and explain concepts to your peers. In fact, some courses might be near impossible to pass if you study solo. Workshops and professional skills seminars can also provide unique opportunities for cooperative learning and collaboration.

Check Out: Tips and Tricks to Study Effectively (Video)

Good luck in your academic journey, and make sure you register on PrepAdviser to stay updated about the latest information on preparing for and applying to international MBA and Master’s programs! Follow us on TwitterInstagram and Facebook.

Source: Magoosh

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