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GMAT Verbal Preparation (Video)

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If you are stressing out over the GMAT Verbal preparation, stop now! There is an easy and practical way to prepare effectively for this section.


Marina Mogilko has scored 700 out of 800 on the GMAT test and in this video she shares her experiences and gives GMAT Verbal preparation tips.

It took two months of intense studying for Marina to be ready for the GMAT test. However, she thinks that if you spend three to four hours a day just on the Verbal part, you could master this section. For instance, in Sentence Correction there are specific patterns that you could learn from practice and apply to every single sentence, which would ensure zero mistakes for this part. Here is some advice on how to approach the material.

The Verbal part takes 75 minutes and consists of 41 questions. This is the last section of the GMAT exam, so you would already have done the other parts before that. This means you would be super-stressed already, so take as many practice tests at home as possible to prepare your brain for this stressful situation.

Check out: How to Prepare for GMAT Verbal (Video)

There are three types of questions in the Verbal section – Reading Comprehension, Sentence Correction and Critical Reasoning. We are focusing on the Sentence Correction part, as it is the one that you can really master. Basically, they will give you a long sentence with a lot of additional details that you don’t need for answering the question. In the sentence they would most probably make a basic grammar mistake that you would easily spot if it was incorporated in a more simply structured sentence. So what you need to do is to eliminate the parts that are not vital for answering the question and look at the sentence as if it’s the easiest sentence in the world.

The mobile app Prep4GMAT is very helpful for Sentence Correction practice. It’s particularly suitable if you are travelling and you don’t have a piece of paper or a desk to sit on. You can choose the number of questions to start with, so it’s the best way to utilise your time while waiting for something.

Last but not least, don’t trust your ear. If you think that something sounds correct, always double check. We use some aspects of grammar incorrectly in our daily lives, thus sometimes we could be easily mistaken.

These were Marina’s tips for the GMAT Verbal preparation. Check out her YouTube channel for more advice on GMAT.

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