3 GMAT Study Mistakes (Quick Reads)

3 GMAT Study Mistakes (Quick Reads)

An MBA blogger, Grant Me Admission, shares his three biggest mistakes when studying for the GMAT. He realized that it wasn’t only important how many hours he dedicated to studying, but how he actually spent that time. His last score was a 710, and he is trying to analyze his mistakes in order to achieve a higher score next time.

Helpful for: MBA Applicants

Read Time: 8 minutes

Quick Facts:

  • Using an error log is instrumental to following your flaws in logic. If you don’t keep track of your mistakes, you will endlessly repeat them, as was the case with the blogger. He accepts this was his first mistake in his GMAT studying. He shares that there are three types of errors test takers make: silly errors, content errors and logic errors. Silly errors can be avoided by concentrating harder. Content errors are instances in which you were unable to find the correct information in order to solve the problem—being more observant will help. Finally, logic errors are made when the content is known but not the logical steps to solve the problem.
  • One way to create an error log is by using handwritten index cards. Grant Me Admission explains:

Chosen Quote:

My error log consists of using 3×5-inch index cards. For every careless error I make, I keep track of it on one card. For example, if I make 2 careless errors out of 20 questions on 7/16, I will write “7/16 – 2/20” and keep track of all my progress on one index card. Towards the end of your GMAT prep, you should not be making any careless errors. For “real errors,” I write whether it was a content or logic error, what type of question it was, what was the content of the question, and how the solution should have been found. It is really important to understand not only why you got the question wrong, but how to get the question right next time. I will then review my 3×5-inch index cards every few days, drilling myself on content & logic.

Useful Information:

  • The GMAT tests your ability to approach a problem from different angles. Avoiding this concept is a mistake. You can improve this skill by practicing several questions. You should focus not only on passing the questions, but analyzing why you got the question right or wrong. Ask yourself, did I take the most efficient path to the answer? Did I miss any aspects?
  • The final mistake the MBA blogger made during his GMAT study sessions was not spending enough time with practice tests. He advises candidates to spend as much time reviewing practice tests as they spend completing the actual test.

Have you noticed you make the same mistakes when studying for the GMAT? Share in our forum!

For helpful tips on how to prepare a GMAT study plan, read GMAT Test: Winning Study Strategies.

Source: Grant Me Admission

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